Hopkins High school senior pens award-winning essay about WWII and democracy

Twelfth-grader Jack Acomb penned a gripping ode to the history of American democracy, and his efforts earned him a second-place finish in a contest sponsored by the National World War II Museum.
February 07, 2018

Hopkins High School senior Jack Acomb penned a gripping ode to the history of American democracy, and his efforts earned him a second-place finish in a contest sponsored by the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. 

The museum’s 2017 student essay contest asked middle and high schoolers to respond with their thoughts on the United States' role as the "Arsenal of Democracy" in both World War II and in modern times. Over 900 students from 44 states, the District of Columbia, and the Ramstein Air Force Base submitted entries. And out of those, Acomb came in second. 

His essay, a 999-word piece titled “Democratic Cooperation,” was entered into the high school category and details the hardships American soldiers had to undertake in order to preserve democracy. He talks about the course of the war and how it shaped our foundational belief system. And he makes a poignant case for how the United States must be a “diplomatic member of the larger global community.”

"It is the United States’ role to set the standard, both within its own borders and externally, of what a successful democracy can truly accomplish when we work together," he wrote in his conclusion.

Read Jack's winning essay here.

 

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